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Indie Interview Music Pop Song

Q&A with Bristol-based pop music duo Yard Arms

Bristol-based jangle-pop powerhouse duo Yard Arms return with their promisingly melancholic new single ‘Mantra’. The single was described by lyricist and frontman Villeneuve as a ‘triumphant love letter to the anxious’.

The track exudes the playful exuberance of Psychedelic Furs and INXS combined with the romantically morose lyricism ala Ben Gibbard or Paul Buchanan. Think John Hughes movies if they were soundtracked by Tim Burton. A pulsating stadium-sized emo-anthem to soundtrack your summertime.

See our exclusive interview with them below:


Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

I think for both of us, some of our earliest musical memories come from the television, whether it be Match of the Day highlight reel soundtracking, or the amount of time we spent glued to watching MTV2, Kerrang, Q, VH1, Kiss and The Box. Very importantly, the impact of certain artists’ imagery that still lasts with us now like The Prodigy, Marilyn Manson, Nirvana, Blink 182, 50 Cent, Weezer, Eminem, Red Hot Chill Peppers, Spice Girls, Sean Paul, the list goes on. Our appreciation for music production came a little later, I think it started to make more sense when we found ourselves being a lot more hands-on with the way our songs and sonics were being handled in the studio. Certainly for myself, I became more engaged with the importance of production in my late teens when I found myself listening to a lot of projects involving Daniel Lanois, Nigel Godrich, Brian Eno, Karl Hyde and Vince Clark. My eyes and ears became open to how you can create complete musical landscapes and environments for albums and carve out a ‘sound’ for artists rather than just a voiceless vehicle for radio or streaming.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

We try not to stick to the same formula every time for the sake of creativity, I believe that comfort or routine doesn’t always provide the best results musically. Music does tend to be the starting point for us, followed by melodies and lyrics later. I will usually have some version of a song shape and colour to bring to Billy and we mould it into something more tangible in the rehearsal room, sometimes ideas will take half an hour to flesh out, sometimes they’ll take a year, there’s no real pattern for us and we like it that way.

What gets your creative juices flowing?

Human connections, romance, grief, guilt, happiness, sadness, life, death. I find the art in all its manifestations to be inspiring, something as pure as a change in the skyline’s colour can trigger my emotions to create.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

There’s a point in every artist’s career where they need to try and learn how to divide their brain into artist mode and business mode, it’s not pretty and it’s not cool, but it’s the truth. I don’t think we’re an artist with business ideas above our station, we’re not approaching this project with any secret plans to overhaul the way in which this beast functions. Every industry has parts that will be agreeable and disagreeable to all individuals within it, we can all choose to involve ourselves as much or as little as we want or think we need. There will always be the game changers in music who we have the utmost respect for, however, we are not trying to reinvent the wheel, we’re just happy to be here and have our creative freedom.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

It’s such a chicken-egg situation for us, both feed into the other but they are such completely different beasts. Both are important for such different reasons. We pride ourselves on our live performances, this is definitely where we feel more of a powerful synergy with our fans, where our music has an instant impact that is so incredibly palpable.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

We’ve had a lot of beautiful reactions to our music in the last couple of years in a variety of fashions so hard to pinpoint a most memorable. However, we played a show to Michael Eavis at the start of this year, and for him to shake our hands and compliment us on the performance was very special and dear to our hearts.

What’s on your current playlist?

Childish Gambino, Caribou, Yves Tumor, Soccer Mommy, Sufjan Stevens, Pool Cosby, Phoxjaw, Chatham County Line, Girlpool, Scout Niblett, Wilco, Heatmiser, China Bears, Teenage Fanclub, Lauran Hibberd, The Lemon Twigs, When In Rome, The Hotelier.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

We’re so excited to kick off this campaign with our next single ‘Mantra’, that is out on May 8th. Following that up we have our isolation anthem coming out early June followed by a full EP at the end of June, more details to follow, eyes peeled. Lots of exciting live announcements in support of this record for the last quarter of 2020 too!

Famous last words?

I’m coming up so you better get this party started.

Follow Yard Arms online 

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Categories
Alternative Music Video News Rock

UK Alt-rock musician Drew Davies releases Twilight Zone video

Previous member of The Mercy House band and  London soloist Drew Davies has premiered the music video for his latest single, ‘X and Y’ via Wonderland. Magazine. The single is featured on his upcoming self-titled album, releasing on the 15th of May 2020. The album boasts boasts mixing credits  by Steve Honest (Oasis, Eurythmics) and mastering by John Webber (David Bowie, Super Furry Animals).

Drew Davies talks about the video, “The video for X and Y acts as a waypoint in time, given that the lockdown was announced hours after we finished shooting. There was a strange atmosphere in the air and London was pretty much like a ghost town; I think because of this and the work of Henry Croston (Director) the video acts as a time capsule for what’s been a very unusual period in our lives.”

Dave Rave share, “The video provides an eerie atmosphere with open yet empty restaurants close to being devoid of patrons. Davies warm vocals soften the unease of the unsettling imagery.”

Davies carries a lyrical message of hope, and light amongst an uncanny atmosphere that feels like you are watching another episode of The Twilight Zone.


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Interview Music New Song

Q&A with Cork-based music producer Mechner

Cork based artist Jack Ahern, described as “Radiohead meets David Lynch”, completely self-funded and self-produced, he had great success with debut single “Surfacing”, notable for it’s music video which garnered over 25k views and was included in Indiecork Film Festival to a great crowd reaction.

Apt considering Mechner’s debut launch show, it was held in an old converted Art-house cinema.

See our exclusive view with him below:

Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

My earliest memories of music appreciation are of my mother singing and playing guitar to me, of me and my sister learning the violin, though I hated the violin, and still kind of do.

I do remember singing to myself constantly and making up songs about my toy cars and other such things, there was a lot of watching and listening to “Disney renaissance” and other animated musicals, being introduced to The Beatles in my dad’s car, and watching Marty Mcfly rip a hole in my mind with his rendition of Johnny B. Goode… I appreciated it all, but I was too young to really get anything from it.

For many years I actually found music boring, I just wanted to play with video games and toys… when all my friends started talking about their favourite bands and artists… I actually found their interest in music annoying, which is incredibly ironic to anyone who knows me.

I didn’t truly appreciate music and production until I started to learn the guitar at 10 or 11, I have a tremendous obsessive streak with music that I like and I tend to live and breathe that artist or song for months on end, much to the dismay of those around me. The positive is that my ear for picking apart arrangements and individual parts of a song is well tuned.

My first real appreciation for music and production was when I first heard a song called “Bad Penny” by Rory Gallagher, it changed the course of my life.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

My process is always evolving and forever changing, I can go through months and in the past years without writing a single thing, though not due to writers block (I don’t believe in writer’s block), then I can sit down and say to myself, “everyday this week 9am to 2pm I will write and complete one song”, and I do. Other times it is very fruitful and creativity flows well as songs fall out of me regularly.

Sometimes it exclusively starts with the melody, sometimes just a riff or a chord progression, or even a dream.

Sometimes it’s a development of an idea that has sat with me for years.

One step that seems to happen nearly every time is I will strive to complete a first draft of a song from start to finish, even if I have dummy lyrics or don’t quite like the structure or something. Then I will pick away at the lyrics and melody in particular, trying to find more eloquent ways of saying a line or to give to my melody a more interesting harmonic structure behind it.

It’s similar to an artist doing a sketch or rough outlines, then filling in the detail after. It’s helpful in actually getting songs done, for me.

What gets your creative juices flowing?

Late night driving, the monotony of the road markings spinning under the car, the numbers on the dashboard mechanically ticking over, the headlights struggling to reveal the black river of tar in front of the car and the relative quiet and empty roads open my mind to many thoughts and lets my brain gestate ideas. There is something so appealing to me about driving at night time… something mysterious, forbidden and sexy. It feels like being in another world.

Also creativity itself gets me going, watching others around me falling for their passion of ideas and concepts.

Finally “work” itself gets me flowing. Once I can get over the hump of actually sitting down to do the “work”, the “work” itself ends up feeding the “work”, and then I feel unstoppable as I tick the boxes and move on to the next project to complete.

The problem is mustering up the courage to actually sit down and do it all.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

I am not sure I fully agree with that statement… as there is an “art” to certain aspects of business.

For example, I used to be all doom and gloom about things like social media, everyone told me “you have to be on this platform”, “you have to post 7 times a day” and “you have to have that platform to be successful”. I just really felt it did not represent me in any truthful way. Then luckily after much internal searching, I found a way to approach things like marketing, updates and posts artistically, to make it all part of the “art”, if you will, to add layers to what I am trying to say to the world.

As for something “about the music scene I would personally change”… I would love to see more variety of music pushed to the masses, I do feel that the majority of music these days that is pushed hard on media platforms and favoured by the algorithm is all based around 3 or 4 different sounds, it’s all too homogeneous. It would be wonderful to have more variety pushed on the radio and other platforms. Open others to new sounds and different ways of thinking. Music is powerful and never meant to just fade into the background and blend all together into a forgettable mush

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

Whilst nothing “quite” beats a live show where the audience knows your music and is fully engaged with your performance.

I have to say I think I prefer the “quiet” contemplation of studio work and creation, it feels like a calm before the storm.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

Still to this day the most memorable response to my music is when I had the opportunity to play live in front of none other than Morrissey in The Workman’s Club in Dublin.

It was a showcase gig and absolutely no one was there, until after our first song 3 people walked in and sat down at a table right in the middle of the venue, the lights on the stage blocked my vision from seeing who these individuals were, but we continued unfazed. Afterwards as we sat down in the green room, when the gig organiser entered and said there was someone upstairs who wanted to talk to us, and that we shouldn’t miss the opportunity.

I felt tired and didn’t really want to go upstairs, though after some cryptic coaxing from the organiser, I came upstairs and was introduced to Morrissey, his manager and his friend.

I would be lying if I said I was “impressed” or “blown away”, as at the time I had little to no interest in “The Smiths” or Morrissey’s music. I remember we sat down with him and his entourage and I was seated next to him off to the side, he was wearing a simple tweed suit and he looked me dead in the eye and said my song was “Simply Brilliant”.

What’s on your current playlist?

I don’t tend to listen to playlists or much music on my phone per se, I generally listen to a lot of vinyl, I have a reasonably sized collection of maybe around 70 or 80.

This makes me really sit down and give the album my full attention, this morning I was listening to the 1979 Joy Division classic “Unknown Pleasures”. Shadow Play is powerful. I have a real taste for older music in production and songwriting, in fact the majority of music I listen to regularly is pre-1970’s.

Other vinyls that currently are getting revolutions on my deck are:

“Grace” – Jeff Buckley
“Odeysse and Oracle” – The Zombies (Yes, that is the way Odeysse is spelt on the album)
“The Doors” – The Doors
“Pet Sounds” – The Beach Boys
“This Old Dog” – Mac Demarco
“0” – Low Roar

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

This year is big for me, it’s kind of do or die, I am aiming to release 4 more singles all with music videos, following “Do you wanna go?” over the summer months, before releasing my conceptual mini-LP “Club Idem” sometime near autumn, the music videos are integral to the body of work as a whole. This is extremely exciting for me to finally see all this work go out to the world after working on it in (ironically) complete isolation and near complete secrecy till now!

Famous last words?

OK, That’s it, Turn off your computer and do something constructive.

Follow Mechner online 

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Categories
Folk Indie Premiere Singer Song

Premiere: Indie-folk singer Cormac Russell announces new song ‘Yankee Fool’

Indie-folk singer Cormac Russell has just announced a brand new song ‘Yankee Fool’ which is set to be released on the 1st of May.

Cormac Russell has taken his music across the globe, including England and China. He released his second album titled ‘Nately’s Whore’ in September of last year. Playing all the instruments himself, he draws from a diverse range of influences; from contemporaries like Mac DeMarco and Nick Cave to literary giants like Walt Whitman.

indie_grøund · [PREMIERE] Cormac Russell – ‘Yankee Fool’

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Categories
Alt-Rock News Song

London alt-rock soloist Drew Davies shares song ‘X and Y’

Rock soloist Drew Davies has released his single, ‘X and Y’ on 1 May via AD1. ‘X and Y’ is lifted from his upcoming self-titled album, which will release on the 15th of May 2020. The album was mixed by Steve Honest (Oasis, Eurythmics) and mastered by John Webber (David Bowie, Super Furry Animals). Davies has been featured by publications, including Clash Magazine, Atwood Magazine, Music Week, Music News, and Pure Grain Audio to name a few. He has also recieved radio play from BBC Introducing London with Gary Crowley, BBC Radio York’s Introducing with Jericho Keys, BBC Wales, Radio X, Planet Rock. Davies cites the sounds of The National, Scott Walker, Vangelis, and Tom Petty as highly influential to his music.

Drew Davies talks about the release, “I wrote ‘X and Y’ on women’s day a few years ago. It’s a song that on one hand calls for equality for all people, no matter their age, sex or orientation; whilst on the other hand calling out hypocrisy stemming from the kinds of people who say one thing publicly and another behind closed doors. It was originally written on piano but for the single and album we decided to add a pseudo-Tarantino vibe with vintage guitars and synthesizers.”

Sound Labyrinth adds,”Lyrically Davies shines a light on modern society, in the hopes to engage and create discourse around the topic of gender normalities.”

Indie Music carries a similar sentiment, “Davies creates retro rock nostalgia in his soundscape on ‘X and Y’, but his message is of modern thinking about gender norms that constrict us from being our true selves.”


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Categories
Band Interview Music News Song

Interview with five piece alternative rock band Ruby Dutch

Five piece alternative rock band Ruby Dutch has created a ferocious sound, culminated with prominent bass and drum lines to groove to. This band have embodied a harmonic relationship between two guitars that are complemented by flowing use of vocals and synthesiser.

The perfect mix between indie and alternative that delights any musical appetite, generated through compatible and organic songwriting that results in a compelling and engaging sound. A sound distilled by influences such as Nothing But Thieves, Foals and Everything Everything.

How has your musical background helped shaped your sound?

The majority of us have done a fair degree of classical tuition growing up, which has helped us to be open to various influences (not just the usual contemporary sounds.) We all met at music uni, each with something contrasting to offer – which kind of blended together into this weird, and hopefully unique sound we’re bringing to the table now!

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

It’s a real natural way of writing, each of us respectively has come up with an idea, whether it’s a hooky riff or melody line, or even a simple harmony, and we progress from there. It’s almost always in a rehearsal environment when we’re all together. Occasionally, we spark an idea at home individually (usually a fuck up when we’re practising) which can also be thrown in the mix. Jess (vocals) establishes a theme from the sound of the instrumental parts to base her lyrics around.

We’re very much a band that are gripped by the idea of rising and fall in music. Take Muse as a primary example. We love to build momentum progressively by chucking stuff in and pulling back on parts at the appropriate times – Jess builds the energy of the lyrics as the music ebbs and flows.

What are or were some of the challenges for you in producing or performing while keeping true to your vision of your music.

We’re trying to tackle a heavily saturated area of music, by instilling powerful, female-fronted vocals, with the catchy indie rock that has made bands like Foals and Everything Everything so prevalent. It’s not always been easy to achieve this – we’re set in the ways that we want to do all of the above but with more atmospherics, however, we have learnt to adapt the preliminary ideas. Not being too attached to the initial ‘finished product’ of the music! We allow a producer with a different ear to adapt a track where needed, for the sake of the overall quality.

I don’t think the energy that is portrayed in the music itself can be questioned. Some of us have had personal issues over our time playing together, that has impacted our level at gigs. Translating that anger and negative energy into delivering a peak performance on stage has actually really helped to deliver what Ruby Dutch are striving for.

Who are three musicians you think the world needs to hear right now?

Franc Moody, Kid Kapichi and Kudu Blue. All bloody brilliant in their own way

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

Performing, 100%. The recording side of things is great fun and instils the ability to nail respective parts down, but nothing will beat the adrenaline rush of playing to a crazy crowd. We matured on stage, not in the studio!

Any “strange tales” or things that may have happened during a show that seemed too weird to be true?

Playing an entire set as the Mystery Gang for a Halloween gig, and our drummer sweated half his body weight out in a full Scooby-Doo outfit…

Do you find that social media and keeping up with your fans has become overwhelming? Or do you rely heavily on others to take care of that for the band? Which platform would you say that you enjoy engaging with the most?

Victor takes care of all things social media and the whole ‘branding’ side of things, acting in a manager capacity. It does take its toll at times, more so because there are always 100 different ideas he has at once to enhance exposure than just doing the simple tasks! It has been an around the clock job, keeping on top of things.. we hope to have more manpower on that front as we progress.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

One person who came to our first ever London gig, said after our performance, that she runs a bar in Utah, and would love nothing more than to put us on when we hit the states! A distant dream yet, but it’s all about building those contacts 😉

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

Naturally, with the whole pandemic, it’s halted all our plans for festival slots and a lot of recording this year. However, we are aiming to have 4 singles out this year, and a massive 2021.

Famous last words?

2020 is OUR year !!!

Follow Ruby Dutch online 

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Categories
Music New Premiere Song

Premiere: indie-folk, music producer Timothy announces new song ‘Alone’

Swedish singer-songwriter Timothy has just announced his brand new song ‘Alone’ which is set to be released on the 17th of April 2020.
The follow up to the recent release “Home”, Alone is a melancholic song searching for love within tranquillity. Inspiration for this track has been my hikes, my quiet times in nature and the simplicity around me.

Follow Timothy online 

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Categories
Indie Rock New band News Song

Indie-rock band Paradas releases new song and electric break-up anthem

Leeds-based band Paradas has officially released their new single, ‘With No Feeling’ via Paradas Records. The single features on their upcoming EP release, After This (17th of June 2020). They have recieved extensive support from the BBC including BBC Introducing Alan Raw, BBC Sussex & BBC Surrey’s Sylvie Blackmore. The band has performed at over thirty gigs within the UK,  opening for acts like Red Rum Club and Max Bloom, of Yuck.

The band includes lead singer Liam Schwegmann from South Africa, drummer Danny Pash from London, as well as lead guitarist Matt Hanson and bassist Cameron Maxwell from Manchester. Band members met and formed together in 2018, during their studies at Leeds Beckett University. They cite inspiration from acts such as  Kings of Leon, Stereophonics, Pixies, Courteeners and Foo Fighters. Paradas’s sound on ‘With No Feeling’ is reminiscent of 2000’s break-up rock anthems. The honest lyrics, emotionally persuasive vocal stylings, and electric guitar riffs make this track emotionally impactful.

Paradas adds,“In an upbeat fashion, this song portrays themes of lost love and loneliness. It speaks about someone in a relationship who’s feeling of love has disappeared, however, they stay with that person in the fear of being alone without them.”

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Interview Music News

Q&A with Sheffield-based Four Piece band PUREST

Sheffield-based Four Piece band PUREST consisting of James Rollings (guitar/vocals), Danny Davidson, (bass), Richard Bithrey (guitar) and Ashley Platts (drums), has already built up a large fan base.

The reason for this is, among other things, their loud, exciting live shows, which also brought them attention from some labels, including that of The Libertines drummer Gary Powell, 25 Hour Convenience Store.

See our exclusive interview with the band

How has your musical background helped shape your sound?

Listening to records that my dad played around the house growing up has inevitably seeped into my subconscious, although sounding unfamiliar at that time once I came of age and started making my own music I instantly knew that I wanted to explore different sounds. We’d liken ourselves to early Cure and Echo and the Bunnymen’s pop sensibilities.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

Often it can start with a hook or a melody on any of the instruments, then the lyrics and structure are something we work on overtime until we’ve fleshed out the track to a place we are all happy with.
What are or were some of the challenges for you in producing or performing while keeping true to your vision of your music.

I think it’s hard to complete your creative vision on the end product exactly how you wish. There are so many avenues to explore that it’s difficult to let songs go or to not want to make improvements to live sets and constantly develop tracks.

Who are three musicians you think the world needs to hear right now?

If you mean in terms of new bands we think the Pale White are fantastic also October Drift have a top new album out! A more under the radar discovery we have made is a song by Dream Ceremony called ‘Hearts on Fire’ which is great, definitely check that out.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

It changes from time to time, we love being in the studio, and the creative process involved in writing but there’s nothing like connecting to an audience especially when it resonates with people and makes a connection.

Any “strange tales” or things that may have happened during a show that seemed too weird to be true?

We did once have a fan that travelled across to all our UK dates which seemed crazy at the time as we had just started but they were dead nice.

Do you find that social media and keeping up with your fans has become overwhelming? Or do you rely heavily on others to take care of that for the band? Which platform would you say that you enjoy engaging with the most?

It’s definitely something we’ve got more involved with over time you almost have to embrace it in today’s culture of social media, in a way I guess it’s positive, we’ve been able to connect with people all over the world from our recent tour which normally you’d never get the chance to converse with.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

When we went on our recent European tour with The Libertines meeting fans in Germany and France was pretty surreal I guess you write in a confined space of four close people and when that translates to other countries it’s surprising in the best possible way!

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

They’ll be a new single we’ve just recorded with Gary Powell that we’re really excited about that will be out in April/May time, then possibly an album.. we’ll keep you posted.

Famous last words?

Listen to us and help spread the word, we hope to see you at a show in the near future!

Follow PUREST online 

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Categories
Interview Music News Song

Interview with France-based folk duo Racoon Racoon

France-based folk duo Racoon Racoon are often compared to The Paper Kites, Fenne Lily or Imaginary Future, their honeyed harmonies are like two beautiful souls dancing between an acoustic guitar and fluttering violins.

The ten-year couple began to compose together when living in Belgium, in 2016 and soon released a first EP “Our Love’s Funeral” in February 2017 on the German label Majestic Casual Records. Early 2018, they released their second EP “Dawn Chorus”, written in the heart of the Italian Alps.

See our exclusive interview with them below:

How has your musical background helped shape your sound?

Léa : Leonard has been playing and making music since he was a teenager, though he was more into teenage rock when he first began… But he was always influenced by The Beatles obviously, and artists like Neil Young, Bruce Springsteen, Townes Van Zandt… He’d always wished to create something in that register. So when we moved to Belgium in 2016 to work in a recording studio and brought with us nothing but an acoustic guitar, that was our chance to start creating this project.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

Léa : Our songwriting process varies from one song to another… The first EP was mainly written by Leo, because they were songs he wrote a long time ago, except for Our Love’s Funeral and Young Wolves. The second EP was written more equitably, and the third was mainly written by myself.
For us both, writing is something very personal, we almost never write together, side by side. The only song that was written this way is “A Wave of Goodbyes”.

We always need to be a bit far from each other, trying things on our own, looking for a spark, and when we have it, we are then ready to share with each other.

When we do, there’s always a fight “Nah I don’t like this, this yes, this no…”, and we eventually come to an agreement. That’s how we know a song is born 🙂

What are or were some of the challenges for you in producing or performing while keeping true to your vision of your music.

Leonard : The most complicated part for us had always been the acoustic folk guitar sound.
I’m still not happy with what we got so far, it was either too roomy, boomy, or the signal to noise ratio was shit.

So I’m still pursuing the quest of a nice and balanced fingerstyle sound, I’m confident we’re gonna get there one day !

Who are three musicians you think the world needs to hear right now?

Bedouine, whose soft voice and production is really soothing in these dark hours we’re all going through, Theo Lawrence who’s only 22 and sounds like some folk band from the 70s, really impressive work ! And then Andrew Bird and specifically his track Pulaski at night which we listen to on repeat because this track is just perfection. Voilà.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

Léa : Studio work is always more comfortable and secure than live performance… You have time, a thousand chances to do it right, there’s no risk, no pressure.

Live performance is the exact opposite, one time, one chance to do it the best you can.

We’ve rarely played live with Racoon Racoon, but every time we have, the reaction from the audience was really worth the risk. There are (almost) no emotions when you record in studio, it is “work”, whereas playing live doesn’t feel to be “work”, and that’s were the true passion unleashes !

Any “strange tales” or things that may have happened during a show that seemed too weird to be true?

Léa : As we just said, we haven’t had a lot of opportunities to play live yet (one was supposed to be next week on a Festival but obviously it’s been canceled…), but we are playing a lot of shows with the solo project of Léo called Camel Power Club, and I think we can both agree on our weirdest moment to also be one of the greatest : in Tecate Pal Norte in Monterrey, Mexico. It’s one of the largest festivals in America, it has 5 or 7 stages I don’t exactly remember, but something really out of this world, enormous.

We were booked on an Electro-DJ scene. Because we are playing live, and actually singing, we couldn’t plug the stage monitors that were placed behind us and could have caused larsen in the mics. The results was that we had zero feedback, so we played the whole show hearing more of the concert that was taking place in the biggest stage 500m behind us (I believe it was the 1975), than our own sound. And the worst thing is that you don’t know if your singing is in tune, and the only moment when you finally hear your voice you realize it is absolutely wrong haha… (Since then we’re using in-ears !) But the audience didn’t seem to care and was absolutely on fire, that’s why I think it was the best concert we played in the worst conditions ever !

Do you find that social media and keeping up with your fans has become overwhelming? Or do you rely heavily on others to take care of that for the band? Which platform would you say that you enjoy engaging with the most?

Léa : Social Media has indeed become a huge part of a band’s activity and communication… Especially Instagram. It can feel overwhelming at times, I think I’ve spent 2 or 3 months without posting almost anything since December, which felt great. It actually really depends on your mood and if you have things/news you wanna share. I think we shouldn’t force ourselves to post anything if we don’t feel like it, unfortunately, because of algorithms and all, you always have to be active if you don’t want to end up in the limbo… And that’s quite irritating.

Today if you take care of everything yourself, like we do, you almost spend more time creating materials for socials than actually creating music, so it’s a bit of nonsense to be honest… But one gotta play the game I guess !

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

Léa : One day, someone reached out from China, saying our songs were buzzing in a streaming platform we never heard of called NetEase, which is a kind of Spotify mixed with Twitter or Facebook… Meaning every listener can put a comment on a song, share it etc. So we looked into it and realized that our song Our Love’s Funeral had indeed several thousands of comments from people sharing their stories, either it was about break up, love, friendship, they were just sharing their lives, with nothing but kindness to each other. That was something incredible to discover ! I think it’s a marvelous feeling to realize your song actually doesn’t belong to you anymore because it has become something else, that has a special meaning in someone else’s life.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

Songs, songs, songs and songs ! And live sessions 🙂 We have a few singles we’re gonna release in the coming months, with an EP planned end of 2020. We also shot a couple Live Sessions with a super talented filmmaker called Danny Feng who lives in Berlin. We’re really looking forward to have these out ! The first will come out around mid April, for Deep Brown Eyes.

Famous last words?

“It is better to keep your mouth closed and let people think you are a fool than to open it and remove all doubt.” Mark Twain

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