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EP Indie Interview New Music Singer-Songwriter single

Q&A with Singer-Songwriter JJ Draper ahead of his New EP “The Theft and The Flight”

After working with Ed Tullett (Novo Amor, Hailaker) on his previous Silhouettes EP, garnering praise from Radio 1’s Huw Stephens and opening for Rhye at London’s KOKO, JJ returns with a delicate and emotional selection of tracks.

JJ’s new single ‘…if you’re awake in the night’ and the upcoming EP “The Theft and The Flight” has all the tenderness and artistry of Sufjan Stevens, Nick Mulvey and Bon Iver while also capturing its own voice and tone. Acoustic guitar-led with soft falsetto vocals, incorporating subtle, dappled sampling, electronics and piano, the new work is an exploration of JJ’s rich and intense, emotional soundscapes.

Following his first EP, JJ went back into the studio to arrange a new body of work. Having spent the early years of his career as a top-liner and collaborator, he thought it time to take a considerable catalogue of songs to his band and work with singular vision to create the sound he wanted.

Speaking on ‘…if you’re awake in the night’ and the new EP JJ said:

“Returning home in March last year to a police cordon around the car park of my flat, I turned on the news to discover that a young man had been brutally murdered on my doorstep. Not having a real insight into the growing culture of gang violence in London, I wrote ‘…if you’re awake in the night’ to chronicle the surreal experience of those who come inadvertently into contact with a troubling world they don’t understand.

I wanted all my new music to be honest and grounded, both lyrically and in the way it was recorded. I spent months experimenting at Natural Habitat Studios working with many great musicians to make something I hope feels homespun, authentic and vivid.”

Listen to JJ Draper’s new single “…if you’re awake in the night” here below and read on to get to know the mind behind the music.



Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

My earliest memories of loving music are in the family car, probably. I’ve got 3 older brothers and we had this enormous space wagon (Toyota Previa RIP) that took us all down to Wales for holidays. We listened to loads of Travelling Wilburys, Bob Marley and Jimi Hendrix.

When I first started to think about music making more deeply-focusing on HOW it was made – I was in my early teens. My brother had introduced me to Jeff Buckley, Rufus Wainwright, Elliott Smith, Nick Drake and it set the wheels in motion toward an obsessive listening period where I absorbed every influence I could.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

It’s a very loose process but is consistently the way I write best so I suppose it’s a formula! I improvise on a guitar (and sometimes piano), often in deranged tunings, and find a progression or part that excites me. Then I’ll begin making melodies and improvised lyrics over that. At that point, the melody and mood start to determine how the progression develops from section to section. I’ll record all this in voice notes until a whole structure is complete and only after that do I sit down and write a structured lyric, often incorporating the nice parts of any improvised moments of attitude and creativity. I write prolifically ‘til I have a load of stuff to record then lose interest in it ‘til I’ve cleared the decks in the studio.

What gets your creative juices flowing?

Difficult to say. I have an internal motor that is always running and a restless energy. My friends and family will do impressions of me “flapping” which is a collective term for all the various pacing, arm waving, hand twitching stuff I get up to when I’m visualising. I sort of black out and have these intense periods of focus and creativity and move around a lot. It’s odd. Although I write honestly about things that happen to me or around me, I think the inspiration is more from the feel and sound of the arrangement I’m imagining. The desire to reach that “goosebump” feeling, that moving unique ambiguous feeling that great musicians have given me my whole life. The song can really be about anything but I’m looking to initiate that ecstatic release for myself and for others.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

Where to start? There’s a lot I’d change about myself, society, humanity, people! Nah, to be honest, I understand the things I find frustrating in the music industry – there’s a lot of fear and a lack of ambition. For instance, an example of what I deem to be bad business, is the pop industry’s obsession with trying to replicate the success of another artist by finding soundalikes. It’s astonishing to me that a lot of money (and there still is a lot of money out there, no matter what people hear) gets poured into artists who are the “next Adele” etc. It’s a sure fire way of getting a quick, decent return on an investment but shortsighted, lacking in ambition and real creativity. I hate the thought of great singers or songwriters being forced to mould themselves around something that has already been. The audience wants new things. Of course you have to trust in the development and packaging of a new thing, but that’s what the industry should be investing in. I don’t mean everyone needs to be a radical, but an honest perspective will always be “new” in some sense, have a unique sound and voice. That and the fact that labels etc are so risk averse that artists often have to be at the stage of self-sufficiency to attract them – like “hmmm, there’s a captive audience that we can jump in on and take a cut of” rather than giving talented people the infrastructure to succeed.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

Impossible question! I’ve been performing since I was 4, was an actor predominantly til I was 21 and the “golden glow” of being on stage, the charged silences and the roar of applause is heaven. I love making people laugh, too, there’s no better feeling. BUT, it does have a tendency to leave you hollow and on a downer, like any drug. The studio and writing, however, is a much more lasting pleasure. The songs continue to make me proud and excited to share, and there are definitely some real moments of ecstasy when you start to realise a sound and it’s just as good as you imagined. I can’t say. I think I prefer performing, JUST.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

I love hearing people have had shivers or tears because that’s always how I’ve judged how much I love something. I have to say, though, at one of our last headline shows at The Grace – having an entire audience belting out the chorus of Gwythian so loud I stopped singing, and turning to my band who were all grinning, was incredibly special. It just felt such a positive thing to share with people.

What’s on your current playlist?

Big Thief UFOF, Wilco Ode to Joy, Todd Rundgren Can We Still Be Friends? I should say I tend to listen obsessively to a few things and not go through reams and reams.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

I’ve got an EP out on 3rd July which includes two new tracks and the two singles I’ve released in the past month. I’m so proud of it, particularly excited to share one of the songs which I think is my favourite piece of production/arrangement that Joey Walker and I have done. After that I’ve got what I hope is a bit of a belting single which is a deliberate and violent diversion in style and then another 4 songs to release whilst recording a full album. At some point, I shall get back to gigging with the band and make 2 videos that were in planning before COVID 19.

Famous last words?

“I told you I was ill” – Spike Milligan got there first unfortunately…

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Music New Music Premiere Song

Premiere: Demons Of Ruby Mae announces brand new song ‘This Is Your Time’

Music duo Demons Of Ruby Mae has announced a brand new track ‘This Is Your Time’ which is set for release the 6th of March.

After releasing their self-titled debut in 2018 and signing to North American and European labels Anti Fragile Records and Long Branch Records respectively in 2019, Manchester indie duo Demons Of Ruby Mae take things to the next level yet again, with their eagerly anticipated new single ‘This Is Your Time.’

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Interview New Music News

Interview with singer/songwriter Ivory Woods

Finland-based singer/songwriter Ivory Woods derives from the fells of Lapland, North American nature and the streets of Northern Britain. It’s bombastic folk yet down-to-earth rock music. It intends to capture the feeling after a long day on the fells and in the woods when the cottage and the body are finally warming up, but it can’t help but speak the language of a rock n’ roll band.

It begins with something close to Bob Dylan, Bon Iver and Sigur Rós, and ends up making a scene with Ryan Adams and Oasis. Ivory Woods will be constantly active with upcoming gigs and new material.

How has your musical background helped shaped your sound?

The group has a very diverse musical background, yet together we’ve always ended up playing some really loud rock n’ roll. Even though we started Ivory Woods with a presumption of hitting that cabin folk atmosphere, it shows again that we can’t help but sound quite big really.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

I have no fixed routine for writing songs. They come to me while walking the dog, taking the bus or whenever. Sometimes nearly complete, sometimes like a distant echo that needs to be met halfway. So at the point, the instruments come to play, it is more about learning the song than writing it. I believe nothing of true value can be forced. You just have to wait, but the circumstances have to be there, the table must be served. I have only written one song while playing Fifa.

What are or were some of the challenges for you in producing or performing while keeping true to your vision of your music.

Some of the songs have gone through quite a transformation as we’ve proceeded to work with them as a group. ‘Northern Soul’ off our first album is a perfect example of this, the original is still on YouTube and it was not intended to sound any other than that. One thing led to another and now with that song you can really get two different experiences, I can’t tell which I like more. But at first, it’s always something to digest.

Who are three musicians you think the world needs to hear right now?

Sepikka is doing some amazing and meaningful stuff in Finland right now. I’ve also done some solo gigs to support Lanai on their tours and their work has some indescribable beauty to it and they are true professionals with lots to learn from. Finally, from the UK, Murkage Dave Changed My Life keeps playing on my deck on a regular basis still, food for thought yet a good laugh.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

Performing. I mean it is a special feeling when you really connect to a song as a recording, but it is a shame when the interaction stops there. In live situations, it’s all there. People need to get together more these days.

Any “strange tales” or things that may have happened during a show that seemed too weird to be true?

We were playing a tiny outdoor festival at a private cabin a couple of summers ago when someone in the crowd told us that the neighbours had called the police. As they arrived, we kept on playing, and rather than telling us to come down they lit their cigarettes and stayed for a couple of songs, telling us to keep going. It was really heart-warming.

Do you find that social media and keeping up with your fans has become overwhelming? Or do you rely heavily on others to take care of that for the band? Which platform would you say that you enjoy engaging with the most?

I don’t stress about it that much, though I know I could be much more active and try holding the community together a bit stronger. It goes in phases, I only want to post stuff if I feel I have something to say so I mainly put out content when something’s going on.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

Somebody once said that everything they’d learned from years of doing yoga they could have learned in an hour from listening to our songs. A comparison to James Joyce followed, but that is just silly.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

We’re planning some shows with our big line-up to celebrate Flickering Light, it’s been a while since we really got to play loud together! I started a series of home recordings called Timberline last year and I wish to put out more tunes this year and do some easier shows as well.

Famous last words?

We always finish our shows with “what was lost was never wasted.”

Follow Ivory Woods online 

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New Music News

Interview with Indie Band The Pocket Gods

St Albans, England indie band The Pocket Gods discovered by the late John Peel and recently featured in Billboard. Faves of BBC6 music, they have just released the groundbreaking 100×30 album (100 songs all 30 seconds long) which has been called by The Independent as the ultimate musical statement against Spotify and will “change the way songs are written” – Spotify pays out a royalty once a track hits 30 seconds (0.007p) and then no more.

See our exclusive interview with them

How has your musical background helped shaped your sound?

not really except in the opposite as I was classically trained at Music School but have been since trying to unlearn everything I was taught and create something different!

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

No – If I’m doing our albums of 100 songs all 30 seconds long which are a protest against lack of royalties from streaming (Spotify and co-pay out a paltry royalty after a song is played for 30 secs and then no more – so why write longer songs?) – I will just come up with a theme – like the music business and then write some titles down and then just plug in and play!

What are or were some of the challenges for you in producing or performing while keeping true to your vision of your music.

It’s easier when you have your own label there are no restrictions and no A and R people telling you to sound like Dua Lipa or Ed Sheeran! Just don’t follow trends or bandwagons and play what you enjoy and makes you feel good!

Who are three musicians you think the world needs to hear right now?

Kevee Lynch punk poet from the UK – he’s like a nice not grumpy version of Henry Rollins! Kill The Giants a genre-bending band who mix up world music, metal and beats. And Gram Parsons…for the soul and romance…and copious drug taking

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

Studio. although playing live is fun unless you’re actually very famous and have thousands of fans it’s pointless – you don’t get paid much and you spend a lot of time hanging around smelly venues with moody promoters hassling you it does not rock n roll it’s just tedious. Being in the studio (especially when you have your own as most people can now) allows your dreams to come into fruition.

Any “strange tales” or things that may have happened during a show that seemed too weird to be true?

Ha! Yep we played a gig way back at a pub which had strippers on in the other bar but we could see it all and it was a bit distracting and then the same night while playing our second set the pub’s furniture was re-possessed as we played so the crown was left sitting on the floor watching us!

Do you find that social media and keeping up with your fans has become overwhelming? Or do you rely heavily on others to take care of that for the band? Which platform would you say that you enjoy engaging with the most?

No we do it all ourselves it is too much but you have to keep it real with your fans otherwise you are fake…deep fake

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

Somebody sent us a tweet after hearing us on the radio said she felt the overwhelming desire to go out and take drugs…someone also said that it sounded like he was listening to 2 separate radio stations at once…I like that one!

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

We have a new single out early March on Nub via Sony Music called Deep Fake which is about the impending doom of AI, sex robots, and not knowing what is real anymore…we live in postmodern dystopian future made real by cartoon-like presidents and leaders…but who is in charge?

Famous last words?

Send out good vibes to all even those who struggle with the truth

Follow The Pocket Gods online 


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Interview New Music News

Q&A with music composer and singer Alex De Rose

St. Petersburg, Russia-based musical composer, guitarist, and singer Alex De Rose composes every note, sound effect, and drumbeat in his home recording studio with feverish passion in complete isolation. Alex comes alive after midnight and often layers his melodies with perfectionistic zeal until dawn breaks through his windows and he collapses into sleep.

He loses track of time as he squeezes richer emotional intonations out of each second of his songs. He’s a tireless artist who doesn’t stop until he feels like each moment of his work conveys the rich emotions and passions that stir inside his consciousness.

See our exclusive interview with the singer below

How has your musical background helped shaped your sound?

There is a ponderous, humming, a vibration that permeates the air of St. Petersburg. It gets into me and it makes me search for ways to capture and express it to the world. I am very much a product of my environment and my music tends to capture this mysterious quality that this city has for me. My sound reflects the frenetic confusion of the port, the distracting traffic in the streets, and the danger of the subway (wherever is dangerous). Sometimes when I am playing I am drawn to rock and roll, pulled into water depths and the blues comes out, then I am excited and I include some rap.  I can’t say that I choose my own genre — the genre chooses me.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

I’ve started working with a lyricist from the Pacific Northwest in the United States named Chris Riseley.  We have so much in common.  It’s weird.  He sends me lyrics and I read them and I use a translator to make sure I understand them completely, and I always end up feeling like I could have written these words, they are so close to what I feel.I take the guitar, at the same time I just try something and read the text, looking for the mood and the general meaning. I catch the rhythm, try different chords and sing the lyrics. I finish this pretty quickly now. Then I do a rough demo and record vocals on it. All this time, I have heaps of ideas from different songs, from some specific styles, I try to take notes about everything. Then when there is a preliminary vocal – I do an arrangement. I try different sounds, instruments, different processing methods, effects. It’s like a journey. I seek and rejoice and do not know where this will lead. And then everything somehow magically develops and I bring it together. For me, it’s all quite mysterious… 

What are or were some of the challenges for you in producing or performing while keeping true to your vision of your music.

When I just start producing a song, I almost immediately hear in my head how the song would sound ready. The song materializes almost completely in my brain.  But it can be difficult to get this sound out of your head and make it real. I search my heart for the right elements and the right sound. There’s a lot of music in my head.  Trying to recreate individual elements. I’m young.  Everything is a learning opportunity for me.  If I need something that sounds like a scream coming out from under a rug — it can take five hours to make that sound exactly right but I find it.

Who are three musicians you think the world needs to hear right now?

I found this band a couple weeks ago – Wild Wild Wets. And I just love it.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

I’m a loner who loves to work until dawn perfecting a mood — but I also love watching the eyes of concert goers go wide when I perform. I like to see shock, surprise, and delight on the faces of the audience.

Any “strange tales” or things that may have happened during a show that seemed too weird to be true?

I play on the streets sometimes. There was this girl who brought a Gecko backstage and she showed me that the Gecko liked to kiss.  I’m not going to kiss a lizard for anyone for any reason. When I play on the streets something strange happens all the time.

Do you find that social media and keeping up with your fans has become overwhelming? Or do you rely heavily on others to take care of that for the band? Which platform would you say that you enjoy engaging with the most?

I’m just starting our so I am interacting with fans personally right now.  It’s usually pretty cool. Even though I like to be alone a lot of the time I always make time in my schedule to thank people who have something nice to say about my music. I am on Instagram mostly.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

Chris has fifteen songs for us and we are going to release them one by one. I will make the sound of each song different. About these songs: it’s the story of how pharmaceutical companies invented a pain killer but then shifted their marketing so that they could create an epidemic of addiction.  Chris watched the pharmaceutical companies kill two of his sisters so he is outraged.  I’m glad he’s five thousand miles away from me.  That guy is pissed.  If I were people selling Oxycontin, I’d be looking over my shoulder.  That’s all I’ll say.

Famous last words?

I’m really new to doing interviews with music media sites.  Can we call this Famous First Words? My famous first words are thank you for writing about Pink Cloud — if you have questions, please hit me up online.  I’ll answer.

Follow Alex De Rose online

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Interview New Music News

Interview with singer Charly Coombes

British singer/ songwriter, musician and filmmaker Charly Coombes has over 10 years experience in the music industry, he was a member of UK blues rockers ’22-20s’, long-time session musician for Supergrass and Gaz Coombes, and worked with many other bands and artists, supporting the likes of Foo Fighters, Kings Of Leon, Stereophonics and The Coral.

See our exclusive interview with Charly Coombes


How has your musical background helped shaped your sound?

We didn’t have many records in the house, growing up. But the select few we did have left a strong imprint – I would play “Sgt. Pepper” and “Thriller” in constant rotation. Those kinds of classic pop records definitely helped to shape me as a songwriter, focusing on strong melodies and a more accessible side to writing. But it was the years spent on the road with bands like 22-20s and Supergrass that would truly help me develop the sound that I wanted to produce.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

I never really follow any particular rules in the writing process. Each song takes you where it wants to go. I do think it’s important to not get stuck in the details. Instead of painstakingly going line by line, chord by chord, just get it down. Then you can go back and start to improve it. It’s so easy to overthink and get lost – sometimes you need to walk down the wrong road to know where the right path was.

What are or were some of the challenges for you in producing or performing while keeping true to your vision of your music.

I think staying true to your vision is a tricky subject for any artist. We all want to let go and really push the boundaries. But at the same time, we secretly want everyone to give it a listen. Finding that balance is an art form in itself. The art of releasing music – not just making it. I remember a year or two back, I was watching the documentary “Chef’s Table”. It dawned on me that the chefs enjoying the most success had abandoned their perception of ‘what people want’ and began to focus on what was right in their heart. I think that’s a good benchmark for any artist.

Who are three musicians you think the world needs to hear right now?

Joe Strummer, George Harrison and Johnny Cash. Frankly, we’re completely lost without those kinds of hearts and minds in modern culture.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

I never much enjoyed being a front-man. My place has always been in the studio. I love creating music, but also I’ve moved heavily into production. It’s there I feel most at home. However playing live is not just an important part of releasing a record, it’s the heartbeat of organic music and should never be ignored. So I’m trying not to ignore it 😉

Any “strange tales” or things that may have happened during a show that seemed too weird to be true?

Ten years on the road will give their fair share of bizarre on-stage events. I think I’ve been lucky to escape the worst of them. But yeah, off the top of my head, I’ve been electrocuted, fallen off stage, fallen on-stage, had the sound turned off mid show, worn surgical gloves, walked out.. and that was just on one tour.

Do you find that social media and keeping up with your fans has become overwhelming? Or do you rely heavily on others to take care of that for the band? Which platform would you say that you enjoy engaging with the most?

I’ll admit, I’m not a fan. Facebook sank its hooks in and we’re all being dragged along. I miss the organic approach, the EPKs, the dodgy shows in A&R hotspots. But I guess until the music industry finds it’s feet, this is the way it is. The upside and downside to social media is that everyone has a voice and we’re all trying to shout over each other. Gets a bit crazy, you know. If I had to choose a platform, it’s Instagram. For now, at least, it’s simple and effective. Photo and caption. Let’s hope they don’t ruin it.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

I love hearing that people are listening to the album on a car journey. That way, you know they’re giving it a good listen from start to finish. To hear that you were the soundtrack to a trip to Wales.. or provided the background music on that bus journey to the South of France – it’s amazing to be part of someone’s memory like that.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

The new album “ALL IN THE END IS HARVEST” will be out in April with new singles and videos on the way as well. It’s going to be a really special release.. but more news on this is coming soon, so stay tuned!

Famous last words?

Time to wake up.

Follow Charly Coombes online

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Music News New Music

Get out your best set of speakers to hear Uppermost’s latest song

French-Iranian producer Uppermost has releasing his flaming new single, ‘Fire Starter’ via Uppwind Records. Feeling the need to express a genuine feeling of revolt and rebelling against the status quo, the producer has stepped away from his own traditional forms of music production. Turning towards a fusion of electronica and rock, ‘Fire Starter’ is one for big speakers.

“In the creative process, I have learnt that any idea or inspiration, no matter how useless it may sound, can trigger a big step towards a beautiful artwork if we act on it. ‘Fire Starter’ is a tribute to those elusive moments that can lead to the biggest changes in our lives if we value their power.”

Uppermost is already teasing his fans with talk of a new release. Earlier this week, he shared on Facebook:

“Just finished reworking one of the simple sessions but it pretty much turned into a new track! I might release this as a new single.”

It’s safe to say that we have marked the producer and eagerly await to see if he ventures further into this new realm of electronica and rock. What do you think he’ll do next?

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Interview New Music News

Interview with Indie Rock n’ Roll band The Burma

Cork, Ireland-based Indie Rock n’ Roll band The Burma was influenced by the American Indie scene of the early 2000s and British guitar bands of the 80s and 90s.

They released their single ‘Quicksand’ in October 2018 and have gained extensive national airplay since its release. It was also made Song of The Day by Joe.ie.

See our exclusive interview with the band below

How has your musical background helped shaped your sound?

We’ve all been interested in music and playing in bands since we were teenagers. Our sound is shaped by the music the three of us are into, bands like The Killers, The Smiths and Arctic Monkeys are all common ground for the 3 of us but each of us have our own favourite bands/albums that we listen to ourselves. I think this makes the sound more diverse. It makes it a sound that’s not just based off of one similar influence but our own individual influences that’s then tied in together.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

Peter, our guitar player is the main songwriter in the band. Once he has an idea for a tune he’ll put a demo together using Ableton Live and send it on to myself and Tony. Tony will put lyrics to it and then the structure, arrangement and ideas are worked out in our rehearsals.

What are or were some of the challenges for you in producing or performing while keeping true to your vision of your music.

Playing certain songs at gigs has been challenging at times and has taken some trial and error to figure out what works, especially if we’ve added a lot of things to the recording. We’ve started to add synths, pads and some other odd sounds to our live shows using tracks that Peter has made in Ableton. It can be tough making sure that those sounds or effects come across in the way you’ve intended them to. You have to make sure that you spend time in rehearsals working on the production of it all before you bring it to the live show.

Who are three musicians you think the world needs to hear right now?

The Davies Brothers from Co. Clare, Ireland. Sara Ryan based out of Cork City and a great Indie Folk band called Rowan, also based out of Cork City – three savage Irish acts.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

We love both but I think doing gigs is definitely where it’s at for us.

Any “strange tales” or things that may have happened during a show that seemed too weird to be true?

Haha not yet

Do you find that social media and keeping up with your fans has become overwhelming? Or do you rely heavily on others to take care of that for the band? Which platform would you say that you enjoy engaging with the most?

I wouldn’t say it’s overwhelming. Social media has become something that all acts need to engage with these days, especially up and coming acts, that’s just the reality of it. The band is run by the 3 of us. We have a booking agent that takes care of our live dates but other than that we’re very much a self-sufficient band. I think Instagram would be the platform we’re most active on these days, it’s not necessarily intentional either, so I guess that means we enjoy that one the most.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

We’ve got a lot of support on release days over the last year which really means a load to us. We feel we kicked it up a gear over the last 18 months or so, so we’re constantly trying to build on that and keep the standard high. We did kind of a hometown gig in Cobh, Co. Cork just before Christmas and had one of the best gigs we’ve had so far there. Tony and Peter are from Cobh and we got savage support from the community. The gig was on in Cobh Ramblers FC and two local acts played support for us that night so it was very much a local affair. Everyone from The Ramblers really treated us well and got behind the gig big time, definitely a night to remember for us.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

We’ll have a brand new 5 track EP called “Sugar Moonlight” out in the next couple of months. We’ll be touring right through to the end of the year off the back of that release both in Ireland and the UK. All gigs will be announced on our website and all social media platforms so make sure to check those out!

Famous last words?

Have a listen to our new single!

Follow The Burma online

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Interview New Music News

Interview with alternative indie-rock guitar band Hybrid Kid

Brighton-based three-piece indie rock band Hybrid Kid has been playing for a number of years in various guises and places, including the US, where the band were based for a prolonged stint. Now back on home soil, appearances on Brighton’s Latest TV, The Roadee, airplay on Xfm, Radio, Reverb and many college radio stations worldwide have slowly built them an underground cult following worldwide.

The enthusiasm and energy of Hybrid Kid is an extension of three wayward personalities: Danny (guitar/vocals), Tim (bass), and Mattia (drums) bring a dynamic and experimental edge to this band of seasoned rock’n’roll travellers.

See our exclusive interview with the band below

Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

My sister’s record collection.  There was Peter Green’s Fleetwood Mac, Zeppelin, early Genesis, Pink Floyd, Bowie, Leonard Cohen.  A lot of stuff I still listen to today.  Late 60s/early 70s was a really imaginative time for music.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

I try to find a chord or riff I’ve never played or heard anywhere before, then start from there.  I’m sure there’s a chord out there somewhere waiting to be invented.

What gets your creative juices flowing?

The best part is bringing a song idea to a rehearsal and seeing what the rest of the band does with it.  Sometimes you end up with something that sounds completely different to how you imagined it would turn out.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

It sometimes seems like as long as you’re great at social media it doesn’t matter how good your music is.  For new bands maybe not charging on the door would be an idea.  Much as I hate to say it but people would rather spend £4 on beer than the risk it on a band they haven’t heard of.  If it was free entry they might just wander in.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

Writing songs is hard and sitting in a studio watching a guy working on pro tools can be pretty dull so I’m going for live performing which is where the fun really starts

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

I once did a show in San Francisco and was talking to an old guy beforehand who’d seen all the great bands who played there in the 60s.  He was saying how going to a gig back then was like going to church, a real spiritual thing for him but things weren’t the same now.  Halfway through our set I looked down from the stage and saw him again, headbanging in the front row.  I think we sent that guy to church that night.

What’s on your current playlist?

Fontaines DC, Goat Girl also into a lot of folky stuff like Big Thief and Sufjan Stevens

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

We have a 3 or 4 brand new singles coming out in the next couple of months and are trying to write a song a week with a view to recording a new album late spring/summer.

Famous last words?

I ain’t dead yet

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New Music News

Award-winning singers Ferris & Sylvester release a music video for their song ‘I Dare You’

Ferris & Sylvester have released the video for their latest single ‘I Dare You’, which wraps up what has been a phenomenal year for the highly acclaimed London duo. The video premiered with Gigwise who called the song, “Pure, furious and carnal bluesy rock ‘n’ roll.”

From hushed folk beginnings, ‘I Dare You’ explodes into an epic piece of blues-rock, calling to mind the likes of The White Stripes or The Kills. The video flits between ethereal immersive colours of the pair, into an intense strobe-lit performance.

Regarding the video Ferris & Sylvester say, “It felt right to create something bold and vibrant. We shot the video whilst we were on tour and wanted to capture how it felt to play the song night after night. The song is angry and aggressive and we were keen to throw all of that at it. It certainly shows a darker shade of us and we’re proud to have it out there.”

‘I Dare You’ was released earlier this year ahead of Ferris & Sylvester’s largest headline tour yet, where they played over 20 dates across the UK and Ireland, including two sold-out nights at London’s Omeara. The single received great support from BBC 6Music and BBC Introducing, alongside critical praise from Metro, The Independent and more.

Ferris & Sylvester have cemented themselves as the most exciting and talked about new name on the blues/Americana UK scene this year.

It was recently announced that the pair are the winners of the ‘Emerging Artist Award’ at the forthcoming UK Americana Awards 2020, selected by Radio 2’s Bob Harris.

The band also made a distinct mark on the US this year, making a killer debut at SXSW, where they performed in over 10 showcases, before returning to continue to impress at Americanafest in Nashville. Ferris & Sylvester have already been announced to play SXSW 2020. Before this, the band will head out on tour across Europe with Jade Bird through February and March.

With the release of their highly anticipated debut album coming next year, Ferris & Sylvester’s unstoppable upward trajectory is set to continue through 2020.

Ferris & Sylvester appeared in a feature on Indie Music

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